I find that the joint filter is the most important part of the joint. For me, the shape of the filter determines the shape of the joint. In practice, the hand that holds and molds the filter has the control and power. The other hand provides stability and guidance. With the paper wrapped snug around the filter, the joint will take on the same shape. You’ll also avoid folds and creases.

So, you should tailor your joint filter to how you want your finished joint to look. If you want a cone-shaped joint, craft a cone-shaped filter. If you need a straight joint, make a straight filter! And if you don’t have a lot of weed, make the filter thinner. Unless you want to make a fat but very short joint.

Let it flow.

It’s also important to consider airflow through the filter. Don’t make it too narrow or it will be hard to take a satisfying toke. And you may encourage tar to build up around the filter. Tar tastes super unpleasant if it gets on your teeth or tongue. I admit, though, that it’s probably better it stays there, rather than in your lungs! For pure smoking pleasure, however, it’s best to keep your filter free from tar.

Tar can be an issue if you leave loose paper around the filter. Many people do this out of preference. But sometimes the paper just isn’t rolled tight enough around the filter. As a result, it can end up sliding too far inside the joint. To avoid this, I let the filter stick out about 20% of its length. When I finish rolling, I push the filter in so it’s perfectly in place.

To stop tar and bits of weed passing through, fold the filter to make a zig-zag shape.

Follow the gradient

I personally make joints that are slightly cone-shaped. The filter has to be roughly the same gradient for the joint to be perfect. So, how do I make a cone-shaped filter from a pre-made filter from a book? It’s very simple. Once you’ve made the zig-zag folds, roll the filter, applying more pressure at one end. This is enough to make the filter conform to a slight cone shape.

How To Roll A Joint Filter with Sion Moker

Take a look at this video guide, lovingly prepared by Simon Moker. Soon you’ll be crafting Ultimate Filter Tips of your very own!